December 21, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas. With their natural display, the herbs help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

After many decades of plant study, I finally found out why some plants will grow completely new leaves, flowers and vines from sections of roots. For a long while I thought that the underground fleshy growth made by bindweed, comfrey and horseradish should be called stems or rhizomes rather than roots.
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December 7, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Understanding and nurturing of subterranean plant growth is very important to successful plant culture. In the garden, this past summer’s annual roots are long dead and in a state of decay in the earth or compost. These tissues are transforming into organic matter, the material that serves as a reservoir for water and nutrients and improves the tilth in soil. The decaying roots that are left in the soil are creating channels by which new roots may travel.
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November 30, 2015

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

The gardeners of the Heritage Herb Gardens have been hopping-to the past couple of weeks as temperatures fell below freezing. First, the tender plants must go in to the greenhouse and cold frames. Decisions about which plants are moved to the warmth of the greenhouse, nestled into cold frames or sent to the compost pile are based on value, available space and the health of the individual plant. Some plants are very tender, some are semi-hardy and some are very hardy but are planted in clay or cement pots that will break if the potting medium becomes frozen.
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October 31, 2015

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas. With their natural display, the herbs help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

There is much more growing on our herbs than what meets the eye. Being familiar with the plant parts that we cannot see are very important to successful cultivation. Subterranean growth includes roots; these appendages secure plants so that they can grow upright. Roots absorb water and soil nutrients through tiny hairs. This solution moves upward through the roots, the stems and out through the leaves. Food produced by photosynthesis in the leaves moves back down through the vascular system to the roots.
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October 24, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas. With their natural display, the herbs help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Peppers, Capsicum species, varieties and cultivars, are collectively designated as Herb of the Year 2016™ by the International Herb Association. The Herb of the Year™ selections are made based on superior contributions to at least two of three categories of herb usage, namely, medicinal, culinary or decorative. Chile peppers are outstanding in all three fields, with uses that expand beyond these major criteria
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August 17, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center State Park graces the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
This season has been a roller coaster ride for tomato gardeners. This spring, into summer, we had record rainfall and cool temperatures. The beds had to be well drained to support tomato life. Then it turned off hot and dry for a couple of weeks. This helped the tomatoes make fruit. Then the temperatures cooled down just a bit, which allowed the fruit to ripen. Just when it looked like smooth sailing, hornworms hatched out. In just two days, these hungry monsters ate their way through most of the tomato foliage and several of the green fruit in the Kitchen Garden. read more

August 10, 2015 
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants. 

Boneset, Eupatorium perfoliatum, is a native perennial wildflower and herb. Its white clusters of flowers are in full bloom now at the top of the plants. The lance-shaped leaves are

long and pointed with serrated edges. They are arranged opposite one another and are without leaf twigs. read more

August 3, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants. 

This column is written to give readers of Yarb Tales the first opportunity to register for the Lavish Herbal Feast, October 1, 2015, featuring dishes from Scandinavia and Northern Europe. Susan Belsinger and the Skillet Restaurant staff have collaborated to create an authentic menu to compliment the theme of the 26th annual Herb Harvest Fall Festival. The South Central District of the Herb Society of America will be holding their Annual District Meeting in conjunction with the festival. We will be hosting HSA members from all over the region, including Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas and look forward to seeing our loyal friends from all over the country who attend every year. read more

July 25, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.  Lemon balm, Melissa officinalis, is a sweet smelling perennial herb from the Mediterranean region in south-central Europe, North Africa and Central Asia. It is in the Lamiaceae (mint) Family. read more
 
July 18, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants. 
 
Whiskey and Tango, the donkeys who work the picnic swing at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, are my boys. They graze a five acre pasture at home during the growing season and eat hay in the winter and while at work. During the work day, they are led to grassy areas so that they can eat some green food. They are fed pressed oats and alfalfa cubes and a hoof supplement as well. read more
 
July 11, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Seed harvest is underway, as a part of herb gardening at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. This week I am yet again thankful to Elizabeth Warner and Billy Joe Tatum for planting a Vitex agnus-castus in the original country herb garden here at the park. This huge shrub is also called chaste tree, monk’s pepper and summer lilac. read more
 
 
July 3, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
This week there are many seeds ready for harvest in the garden and many in the landscape that threaten to shatter and populate next season’s garden with unwanted invaders. read more
 
 
June 16, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Elder, Sambucus nigra var. canadensis is in bloom right now all over north central Arkansas. Tiny flowers are borne in flat-topped, umbrella-shaped corymbs, in masses—they are cream-colored and sweetly fragrant—some can be as wide across as a dinner plate. Elderflowers begin to appear in our zone 7 areas in late May and last a couple of weeks. This is a small window of time read more
 
June 8, 2015 
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center State Park graces the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Summer heat is building and fiery-flowered tiger lilies are opening their faces to the earth. The most common varieties sport clusters of two-inch blossoms that are bright orange with black spots. The petals curve backwards, towards the sun, from the downward-facing flowers. Black bulblets form in the leaf axis and drop to the ground after the plants flower. This is how Asian lilies reproduce. The plants grow to between three-and four-feet tall and are true lilies (Lilium spp.). Read more

 
June 1, 2015 
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center State Park graces the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
The abundance of rain occurring this spring is both a blessing and a challenge in the garden. Plants are growing without the help of irrigation. Some Mediterranean herbs, roses and other specimen plants have developed fungal diseases. One of the best organisms to help plants resist disease is called mycorrhizal fungi. Read more

 
May 11, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and potential for delicious flavors. With their natural display, they help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Composting is a natural process that has been taking place on earth since life began. It is the biological reduction of organic waste to a stable material called humus. The dark-colored, crumbly, sweetly fragrant layer of material found just under the leaf litter in the woods is humus. Worm castings are humus. Loam, the best soil, is composed of humus, clay, silt and sand particles.  Intentional composting is the single, most important human activity that can be performed to improve and maintain healthy soil.
 
May 4, 2015 
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas. With their natural display, they help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
The frequent rains, though welcome, have slowed progress in the garden. Walking, and especially, the use of heavy equipment in the yard and garden, when the ground is muddy, compacts the soil. Clay particles become elastic and sticky from water and soil disturbances.
 
April 13, 2015
 The Heritage Herb Garden, at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, graces the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
This time of year, observant hikers and gardeners are noticing long, slender stems with thin hirsute leaves draping across other low growing vegetation in the garden and in open places in the woods. The leaves, usually eight, occur in whorls around the stem at every node.
 
March 30, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden, at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, graces the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
In the spring landscape our eyes are awed by the blooms of underground stems. Yes, jonquil, daffodil, iris, bloodroot and violet flowers all arise from bulbs, corms, tubers and rhizomes which are botanically designated as stems. 
 
March 16, 2015
 The Heritage Herb Garden, at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, graces the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
This minute I am anticipating walking the woods with friends and mentors during the Medicinal Herb Field Trip and Workshop coming up the first Friday and Saturday of April. Every spring I get the fever to smell the warming soil and look at all of the plants that are awakening to grow another season.
 
March 9, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden, at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, graces the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Naturalists, when used as a noun, describe persons that are students of natural history, life scientists and wildlife experts. The naturalists in my life were born with a desire to spend time outdoors to experience and to know about nature.
 
March 2, 2015 
The Ozark Folk Center's Heritage Herb Garden staff and the Herb Society of America-Ozark Unit along with state and federal interpreters collaborated to create a demonstration garden at the Arkansas Flower Show at the State House Convention Center in Little Rock...
 
February 17,2015
This column has been a study in chocolate since the second week of January.  It is time to share some recipes.

February 2, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden, at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, Graces the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Yarb Tales this week will address the classification of cocoa beans.  When we shop for chocolate, there is a wide range of products available to us. 
 
January 12, 2015
The Heritage Herb Gardens, at he Ozark folk Center State Park, grace the grounds with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Last column, I wrote about the experience of popping a bittersweet chocolate chip into my mouth.  During the Christmas season, I had the pleasure of visiting the U.S. National Arboretum and saw a living Cocoa tree.
 
January 5, 2015
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
The 2014 educational programs of the Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center State Park were well attended. The purpose of Ozark Folk School, the Herbal Fieldtrip and Medicinal Herb Workshop and the Herb Harvest Fall Festival is to provide an enjoyable learning experience that is applicable to the daily lives of the participants. After all, herbs are plants that we use. The most up-to-date 2015 herb class information, including schedules and registration forms may be found at http://www.ozarkfolkcenter.com/herbs/events/.aspx or by calling 870-269-3851.

November 29, 2014

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Possumhaw, Ilex decidua, is showing off masses of bright red berries along fence rows and stream banks throughout Arkansas just now. The Latin species name indicates that the leaves fall in autumn, unlike its evergreen cousin, American holly, Iopaca. The berries, technically called drupes, will persist through the winter, contributing color to the natural landscape for Christmas. The berries are toxic if eaten in quantity. According to drugs.com, fatalities have not been reported; this is likely because the fruit tastes very bitter.
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November 22, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Native honeysuckle, Lonicera sempervirens lives in the Heritage Herb Garden. It is a welcome resident, unlike its cousin, Japanese honeysuckle, L. japonica. The native will not take over the garden or forest. The vines can grow up to 20-feet long. Though twining, the coral-flowered honeysuckle in the Heritage Herb Garden does not climb or wind around neighboring trees. 
 
November 18, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
Blueberry bushes, Vaccinium corymbosum are planted alongside the Basket Shop inside the CraftVillage at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Strawberries, Fragaria xananassa were planted in the same bed as companion plants. In the first season, ripe berries were handy to new basket owners! 
 
October 27, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
The big question on the lips of many visitors to the Ozark Folk Center State Park is, “What is that bush with the clusters of purple berries growing along the stem?” The local name is French mulberry, an understandably fancy name. The Latin name is Callicarpa americana. It is not related to mulberry and it is an American native, not from France. The modern common name is American beautyberry. 
 
October 18, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

On Saturday, October 18, 2014, over 30 Arkansas Master Naturalist volunteers descended upon the Ozark Folk Center State Park. They broke into teams and accomplished a wide range of much needed work.

One group worked to rebuild the foot bridge on the City Park creek trail and did clean-up along that trail. This project was in collaboration with the Master Naturalists, the city of Mountain View and the Ozark Folk Center State Park. 
 
September 30, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plant. The flax growing in the Heritage Herb Garden is nearing time for harvest. Flax, Linum usitatissimum, is grown for its delicate blue flowers in a pleasure garden and, agriculturally, for seed, seed oil and textile fiber.
In the last column, we learned about all of the great uses for flaxseed. Now we will take a look at why it is growing near the Spinning Shop in the Ozark Folk Center State Park Craft Village. It has been grown in temperate climates worldwide for ages. No one knows its exact origin, though it is thought to have started in a region extending from the eastern Mediterranean to India. Linen has been found in Egyptian tombs and both flax as a crop and linen cloth are written in the Bible. The fiber was spun and woven into yarn and thread to make robes, bed sheets, curtains, sail-cloth, rope, fishnets, bowstrings and lamp-wicks.
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September 15, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
Gardeners experi-mint with herbs of the genus, Mentha. By that I mean, mints get planted in the garden and they run wild. Then, not to be outdone by a plant, mints get planted in various pots and other containment apparatus to see what will happen—what happens is, the plant either escapes captivity or requires seasonal root division and fresh soil or it dies.
The Heritage Herb Garden has at least five species of Mentha. Spearmint, Mentha spicata, is probably the most familiar. Spearmint comes in a wide-range of fragrance clones. The name refers to the spiked flower inflorescence that all varieties of spearmint produce. Our favorite cultivar is ‘Kentucky Colonel’. The leaves are deeply veined and lance-shaped. The growth is extremely vigorous in moist, rich soil. The taste of spearmint is cool, though not as sharply cold as peppermint.
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September 8, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
Recently I was reading an insightful book about relations between people and animals that helped me to think about relations between people and gardens. Don Hamilton, DVM, in Homeopathic Care for Dogs and Cats describes humans and animals that share a home as guardians and companions rather than owners and pets. (By the way, this book is a very good reference for herbal and nutritional care of domestic canines and felines—it also explains homeopathy in understandable terms.) 
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August 18, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
 
This past Saturday afternoon, members of the Herb Society of America, Ozark Unit harvested ripe elderberries from the shrub growing in the Folk Kids’ Mountain Garden inside the Craft Village. Beth Peck Cooper, Kathleen Connole, Theresa Kirksey and I sat in the shade, separating the berries from the stems for two hours or so—many hands make light work. We will make elderberry shrub for the Herb Harvest Fall Festival, October 3 and 4, 2014. The study this year is the foods, folkways and herbs of the British Isles to the Ozarks. The schedule is now posted at www.ozarkfolkcenter.com on the herb page. Elder is one of the many herbs that people of both regions share in common.
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August 11, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center State Park graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas. With their natural display, the herbs help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

After being spoiled rotten for the majority of the spring and summer, it seems we are going to have to remember how to be gardeners during a dry, hot spell. This is normal weather and does not have to give cause for alarm. It is just a time to adjust actions and expectations in the garden.

First of all, when working outside, remember to drink plenty of water. It is important to drink before you feel thirsty. Lifetime outdoor laborers are successful because they start work very early in the morning and drink lots of water before ever going outside and then continue to hydrate all day. When I begin to feel dazed, I also drink a cup of water with Emergen-C® powder for a boost of electrolytes and vitamins. Some friends use sport drinks to replace the electrolytes lost through perspiration.

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August 5, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and potential for delicious flavors. With their natural display, the herbs help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Members of the Herb Society of America Ozark Unit, Susan Belsinger, the Skillet management team and the herb gardeners have been planning the Herb Harvest Fall Festival. The theme this year is The Foods, Folkways and Herbs of the British Isles to the Ozarks! This festival traditionally opens on Thursday evening with a garden reception and herb feast. On October 2, the party will be a High Tea Supper celebrating the British Isles. Diners are encouraged to dress their best. The garden reception, planned and hosted by The Herb Society of America Ozark Unit will begin at 6 p.m. in the lobby of the Administration Building. The reception will include Potato Cakes, Boxty, Tomato Chutney, Irish Cheddar Cheese, Salmon Pâté and Herbal Libations. Joe Jewell’s Mulligan Stew will entertain in the garden along with other wonderful surprises.

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July 28, 2014

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and potential for delicious flavors. With their natural display, the herbs help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

The following recipes for gardener’s comforts are excerpted from the creative herbal home by Susan Belsinger and yours truly. I demonstrated the concoctions during the International Herb Association’s annual conference which was held in Toronto just last week.

gardening comforts

With the joy of gardening and all other outdoor summer recreation comes the challenge of staying comfortable—and protecting ourselves from biting bugs, harmful sunrays, and irritating plant oils—and healing the damage that is done to our largest organ, the skin. To be at ease in the great out-of-doors, we have to be smarter and more disciplined than the natural forces in and around us. Physical discomforts contracted from nature can be modified, though never entirely conquered. We can reduce contact with the pests and speed the healing of the hurts to reduce suffering.

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July 15, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center State Park graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

During the past several weeks the garlic growing in the Heritage Herb Gardens has been harvested. The perfect time to “pull” garlic is when the leaves have begun to yellow but while there are still four sets of leaves still green. It is also good if the soil is moist but not soaked from recent rain. When the garlic is ready to be lifted, it may pull easily without the use of a spade. However, if the soil is very dry, or the bulb is buried too deeply in the soil, the stem often pulls loose, leaving the bulb still lodged in the soil. For best results, use a spade to lift the garlic. If the soil is muddy, the bulbs are harder to clean. Timing is everything in life, including harvesting garlic.

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July 9, 2014

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and potential for delicious flavors. With their natural display, they help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

 

Susan Belsinger and Tina Marie Wilcox wrote the creative herbal home to help keep herbal traditions alive. We write about, grow and use Echinacea. We cultivate the Echinacea’s because they are handsome perennial flowering plants that add height and color to our gardens, and show off their splendid cone heads throughout the summer and into the fall. Butterflies and birds are attracted to these purple, pale lavender, white, and yellow coneflowers. During the flowering season and after the plants go dormant in the colder weather, we reap the health benefits of Echinacea by making our own tinctures. This is not difficult to do and it is both rewarding and fulfilling work. We feel that making tinctures from our own organically grown plants is the best medicine possible.

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July 1, 2014
Fighting to Win the War on Weeds Part 2 Perennials

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and the potential for delicious flavors. With their natural display, they help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Weeds are plants that are not wanted where they are growing. Aggressive plants will out-compete the mild mannered ones if the bullies are allowed to run rampant.

Plants have specific life cycles. The previous column discussed the control of annuals and biennials. Perennials may be born from seed or reproduce by vegetative means. They live for years and may also flower and disperse ripe seed every season. Understanding how plants procreate and spread and then taking action to prevent the encroachment of perennial stems and the dispersal of ripe seed is an important key to winning, eventually.

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June 23, 2014

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and potential for delicious flavors. With their natural display, they help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Weeds are plants that are not wanted where they are growing. An herbalist makes it a point to know them by name and understands that they may be useful, living elsewhere. A naturalist studies the inter-relationship between plants and wildlife. A gardener is the judge and executioner, cultivating nature to realize a vision within the garden boundary. All gardeners know that, like the human race, aggressive plants will out-compete the mild mannered ones if the bullies are allowed to run rampant. Fighting weeds, like other evils, is inevitable if you are attempting to grow specific plants. Be you obsessive-compulsive or laid back in your gardening style, you have to exercise some control over the environment.

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June 14, 2014

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

A native plant showing off this week on the roadside is butterflyweed, Asclepias tuberosa. It stands out amongst the green grasses with gaudy (this is meant in the nicest way) umbels of orange flowers. A word about conservation; it is best to collect seed from native plants rather than to attempt to transplant them. Purchase plants from nurseries that promise that they grow native plants from seed.
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May 27, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and the potential for flavor and better heatlh. With their natural display, they help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
It is time to run out to the garden to gather a greens feast! Lamb’s-Quarters, Chenopodium album— the common lamb’s-quarter leaves are blue-green on top and grey on the lower surfaces with soft, short fuzz. The leaves are shaped like goose feet, inspiring another common name for this common garden weed, ‘goosefoot’. They alternate on the stems. The stems and leaves are often tinted with red streaks.
May 20, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.
Garden Glory Days at the Ozark Folk Center State Park will take place Tuesday through Saturday, May 20 through 24, 2014. Craft Village tickets are required for admission. Each day Kathleen Connole or Tina Marie Wilcox will meet herb enthusiasts at the Herb Shoppe to lead a garden tour at 11 A.M. Then, visit the Herb Shoppe at any time between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. for a short class on growing herbs in containers. Friday afternoon features a Musical Herbal Tea at Three, with music by the Herbin’ League, complete with an iced lemon herb infusion and tangy, lemon thyme muffins.
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May 12, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Garden Glory Days at the Ozark Folk Center State Park will take place Tuesday through Saturday, May 13 through 17 and May 20 through 24, 2014. Craft Village tickets are required for admission. Each day Kathleen Connole or Tina Marie Wilcox will meet herb enthusiasts at the Dr. Bessie Moore Deck to lead a garden tour at 11 A.M. Visit the Herb Shoppe at any time between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. for a short class on growing herbs in containers. Both Friday afternoons feature a Musical Herbal Tea at Three, with music by the Herbin’ League, complete with an iced lemon herb infusion and tangy, lemon thyme muffins.

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May 6, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

The Heritage Herb Garden has many new plants to display in the new garden areas that have been created around the park as a part of the new pathways project. Many of them are still waiting in pots.

Other gardeners may notice that mature potted plants dry out quickly and begin to yellow on their lower leaves. This is a sure sign that these specimens are root-bound. To save these plants from stunting or death, it is necessary to take action. If weather or other events make it necessary to hold them in containers for a longer period of time, they must be transplanted to larger pots. This can be done in the potting shed or garage after supper if all else fails.


April 22, 2014
The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Saturday, May 3, 2014, the Heritage Herb Garden crew and supporting friends will celebrate National Herb Day with the annual Heritage Herb Spring Extravaganza! The Committee of 100’s Herb Garden Committee, led by Jennifer Blankenship, will serve herbal refreshments in the Herb Cabin between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.; The Herb Society of America’s Ozark Unit, headquartered at the Ozark Folk Center, will demonstrate the uses of Artemisia in the Folk Kids’ Mountain Garden. Tours of the garden will be conducted at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.; they will begin at the Herb Shoppe. Craft Admission tickets are required for activities occurring inside the Craft Village.