Yarb Tales

Comfrey Uses

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas; and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Comfrey is a leafy, herbaceous perennial with a long history of medicinal use. Its Latin name, Symphytum officinale, from the Greek word, symphis, means growing together of bones; phytom is the Latin word for plant; and officinale means that the plant has uses in medicine or herbalism.
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After The Killing Frost

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas; and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

Temperatures dropped to the low thirties and upper twenties last week. Basil was cut, buzzed in blenders with olive oil and frozen for sauces. Countertops in the homes of gardeners are laden with tomatoes and peppers of every hue. Butterbeans and peas, some ripened and dried and others with green shells are awaiting processing. All of this bounty, waiting safely inside after several days of a harvesting flurry needs to be stored properly for winter meals.
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Herb Harvest Fall Festival Thank-you's

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas, and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

The 27th Annual Herb Harvest Fall Festival took place October 6, 7 and 8. Thank you to everyone who supported and participated in this enjoyable and educational event. Special thanks go to the Herb Society of America's Ozark Unit. Members and fiber artist, Jeanette Larson transformed the Ozark Folk Center with flowers, fibers and flavors of South America. They stirred up delicious libations and snacks for the traditional garden party that proceeded the Lavish Herbal Feast. The group performed the Chilili folk dance of Bolivia. Read more

The People of Central America

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas; and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

The Herb Harvest Fall Festival schedule is now posted at www.ozarkfolkcenter.com on the herb calendar page. This event showcases the plants that provide us with herbs, foods and medicines that originated in Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean Basin.

Central America is a land bridge or isthmus between South America and North America. It is one of the most ethnically diverse areas in the world. Its countries include Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala which are Latin American because they were part of the Spanish Empire. Belize is Anglo American because it was invaded and colonized by Great Britain. Read more

Mycorrhizia, A Friendly Fungus

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas and helps us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

There is much more growing on our herbs than what meets the eye. Being familiar with the plant parts that we cannot see are very important to successful cultivation. As our herb garden team plants seeds, cuttings and root divisions in pots and in the garden, we are constantly taking action to enhance heathy root growth. These actions include transplanting potted plants when they show signs of being root bound; making sure that our herbs have good drainage; using potting mixtures that contain friendly fungus and mycorrhizia and feeding the plants and their growing media with natural fertilizers. Read more

Wet Soil

The Heritage Herb Garden at the Ozark Folk Center graces the park with visual colors and textures, sweet and pungent aromas. With their natural display, they help us to interpret the history of the human use of plants.

We have enjoyed frequent spring rains this year. The moisture does come with a price. It speeds up plant growth and slows down the progress of wise gardeners. Walking, and especially, the use of heavy equipment in the yard and garden, when the ground is muddy, compacts the soil. Clay particles become elastic and sticky, causing soil to cling to weed roots. Machines operated on wet soil causes deep ruts and hard clods. Read more

Elephant Garlic Revisited

Elephant garlic, Allium ampeloprasum var. ampeloprasum is a relative of garlic, onion and leek that lives in many local Ozark Gardens and survives long after cultivated areas are abandoned. It is named for it very large, often apple sized bulbs. Individual cloves can be the size of regular garlic bulbs. Click on the title to read the complete Yarb Tales.